A.D. 2000

TitleA.D. 2000
Year for Search1890
AuthorsFuller,, Lieut. Alvarado M[ortimer] U.S. Army (1851-1924)
Date Published1890
PublisherLaird and Lee
Place PublishedChicago, IL
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

A sleeper wakes in 2000 and finds significant economic and political reform and major improvements in technology but little social change. The face of the United States has been changed by the sinking of the middle west and the formation of a central sea in its place and by the acquisition of all lands south to Panama and north to the Arctic. There is a 20% limit on profit, but the employer is allowed to set wages (no unions), which has raised wages. The government is largely financed out of excess profit. No one can hold more than 640 acres (1 square mile), and no foreigners may hold land at all. The government owns all the utilities and the railroad system. The profit on these activities also helps finance the government. No political parties. Juries abolished. The author says that he chose the title and theme in November 1887, before Bellamy’s Looking Backward was published.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971. Another ed. with a different illus. Chicago, IL: Laird and Lee, 1892. Rpt. with a different illus. as Back to Life (A. D. 2000). A Thrilling Novel. No. 43 of Standard Library. Chicago, IL: Laird & Lee, [1911].

Info Notes

The author says that he chose the title and theme in November 1887, before Bellamy’s Looking Backward was published.

Illustration

Illus.

Holding Institutions

L, MoU-St, PSt

Author Note

(1851-1924)

Full Text

1890 Fuller, Lieut. Alvarado M[ortimer]. U. S. Army (1851-1924). A. D. 2000. Illus. Chicago, IL: Laird and Lee. Rpt. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971. Another ed. with a different illus. Chicago, IL: Laird and Lee, 1892.  Rpt. with different illus. as Back to Life (A. D. 2000). A Thrilling Novel. No. 43 of Standard Library. Chicago, IL: Laird & Lee, [1911]. L, MoU-St, PSt

A sleeper wakes in 2000 and finds significant economic and political reform and major improvements in technology but little social change. The face of the United States has been changed by the sinking of the middle west and the formation of a central sea in its place and by the acquisition of all lands south to Panama and north to the Arctic. There is a 20% limit on profit, but the employer is allowed to set wages (no unions), which has raised wages. The government is largely financed out of excess profit. No one can hold more than 640 acres (1 square mile), and no foreigners may hold land at all. The government owns all the utilities and the railroad system. The profit on these activities also helps finance the government. No political parties. Juries abolished. The author says that he chose the title and theme in November 1887, before Bellamy’s Looking Backward was published.