"Christmas in the Year 2000"

Title"Christmas in the Year 2000"
Year for Search1895
AuthorsBellamy, Edward(1850-98)
Secondary TitleLadies Home Journal
Volume / Edition12.2
Pagination6
Date PublishedJanuary 1895
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Picture of a future Christmas as an addition to 1888 Bellamy Looking Backward, the book for which he is best known. After publishing Looking Backward Bellamy became a social reformer and was involved with two journals, The Nationalist (1889-91) and The New Nation (1891-94), which he edited and published, and wrote many essays defending or elaborating his position; some of these have been collected in his Edward Bellamy Speaks Again! Articles–Public Addresses–Letters. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1937. 2nd ed. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938; and Talks On Nationalism. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938. 1897 Bellamy is a sequel to Looking Backward and 1889 Bellamy, “With Eyes Shut,” and 1891 and 1895 Bellamy are set in the same eutopia. Utopias not directly connected to Looking Backward are 1886 Bellamy and 1889 Bellamy, “To Whom This May Come.”

Info Notes

Author Note

(1850-98)

Full Text

1895 Bellamy, Edward (1850-98). “Christmas in the Year 2000.” Ladies Home Journal 12.2 (January 1895): 6.

Picture of a future Christmas as an addition to 1888 Bellamy Looking Backward, the book for which he is best known. After publishing Looking Backward Bellamy became a social reformer and was involved with two journals, The Nationalist (1889-91) and The New Nation (1891-94), which he edited and published, and wrote many essays defending or elaborating his position; some of these have been collected in his Edward Bellamy Speaks Again! Articles–Public Addresses–Letters. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1937. 2nd ed. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938; and Talks On Nationalism. Chicago, IL: The Peerage Press, 1938. 1897 Bellamy is a sequel to Looking Backward and 1889 Bellamy, “With Eyes Shut,” and 1891 and 1895 Bellamy are set in the same eutopia. Utopias not directly connected to Looking Backward are 1886 Bellamy and 1889 Bellamy, “To Whom This May Come.”