The Emigrants, &c or the History of an Expatriated Family, Being a Delineation of English Manners, Drawn from Real Characters, Written in America

TitleThe Emigrants, &c or the History of an Expatriated Family, Being a Delineation of English Manners, Drawn from Real Characters, Written in America
Year for Search1793
AuthorsImlay, G[ilbert] Esq.(1754-1828)
Tertiary AuthorsImlay, G. Esq.
Volume / Edition2 vols.
Date Published1793
PublisherA. Hamilton
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

There is a short section (Letter LXX) that describes what appears to be intended as a eutopia, but there is little detail. Eutopian imagery is used throughout the text to describe the Ohio Valley as a place to settle.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. Dublin, Ireland: Ptd. for C. Brown, 1794; as The Emigrants (1793) Traditionally Ascribed to Gilbert Imlay But, More Probably, By Mary Wollstonecraft. A Facsimile Reproduction of The Dublin Edition (1794). Gainesville, FL: Scholar’s Facsimiles & Reprints, 1964 with an “Introduction” by Robert R. Hare (v-xv); and as The Emigrants. Harmondsworth, Eng: Penguin Books, 1998 with an “Introduction” by Wm. Verhoeven and Amanda Gilroy (ix-lix), “Explanatory Notes” (257-304), and a “Glossary” (305-06). The Penguin ed. reprints the 1st ed.

Holding Institutions

PSt

Author Note

(1754-1828)

Full Text

1793 Imlay, G[ilbert], Esq. (1754-1828). The Emigrants, &c or the History of an Expatriated Family, Being a Delineation of English Manners, Drawn from Real Characters, Written in America. 2 vols. London: A. Hamilton. Rpt. Dublin, Ireland: Ptd. for C. Brown, 1794; as The Emigrants (1793) Traditionally Ascribed to Gilbert Imlay But, More Probably, By Mary Wollstonecraft. A Facsimile Reproduction of The Dublin Edition (1794). Gainesville, FL: Scholar’s Facsimiles & Reprints, 1964 with an “Introduction” by Robert R. Hare (v-xv); and as The Emigrants. Harmondsworth, Eng: Penguin Books, 1998 with an “Introduction” by Wm. Verhoeven and Amanda Gilroy (ix-lix), “Explanatory Notes” (257-304), and a “Glossary” (305-06). The Penguin ed. reprints the 1st ed. PSt

There is a short section (Letter LXX) that describes what appears to be intended as a eutopia, but there is little detail. Eutopian imagery is used throughout the text to describe the Ohio Valley as a place to settle.