Excelsior; or, The Heir Apparent. Showing the Adventures of a Promising and Wealthy Young Man, and His Devoted Friends; and Presenting Entwined with the varying story, the Key to a Diamond United States, or a Vitally Consolidated Republic, A Perfect Union, Otherwise Kingdom of Heaven. Likewise Giving, in Picturesque Dramatic Dialogue, the Notorious Actions and Secret Lives of Two Celebrated Dictators of Party and Leaders in Political Conventions. The Whole Embodied in A Thrilling and Exquisite Poetical Romance

TitleExcelsior; or, The Heir Apparent. Showing the Adventures of a Promising and Wealthy Young Man, and His Devoted Friends; and Presenting Entwined with the varying story, the Key to a Diamond United States, or a Vitally Consolidated Republic, A Perfect Union, Otherwise Kingdom of Heaven. Likewise Giving, in Picturesque Dramatic Dialogue, the Notorious Actions and Secret Lives of Two Celebrated Dictators of Party and Leaders in Political Conventions. The Whole Embodied in A Thrilling and Exquisite Poetical Romance
Year for Search1860
AuthorsLookup, Alex[ander] [pseud?]
Date Published1860
PublisherKennedy
Place PublishedNew-York
KeywordsUS author
Annotation

Mostly on current evils but includes a eutopia based on universal suffrage and everyone becoming their own landlord by buying property through rent in installments. Marriage at sixteen. Loaded with generalities and terribly written. See also 1860 Lookup, The Road Made Plain and 1860 Lookup, Soldier of the People. Two other works that are related but not specifically utopian appear to complete Lookup’s publications–Italy free, or Our hero abroad, representing the enlightened battle of the age, beginning at Rome and ending in a triumphal entry into Paris. New-York: Kennedy, 1859; and The granddaughter of the Caesars, or, The hag of the earth and the syren of the waters: containing, besides, a pathetic story of greed’s victims and difficulty’s brokers. New York: Kennedy, 1860. Excelsior, Soldier of the People, and The granddaughter of the Caesar’s are included, separately paged, in his Popular Romances for the Times. I. Excelsior; or, An interesting young man and his friends. II. The soldier of the people; or, The enlightened captain and liberator. III. The granddaughter of the Caesars; or, Hag of the earth and syren of the waters. New York: Kennedy, 1860.

Pseudonym

Lookup, Alexander [pseud?]

Holding Institutions

DLC, HRC

Full Text

1860 Lookup, Alexander [pseud?]. Excelsior; or, The Heir Apparent. Showing the Adventures of a Promising and Wealthy Young Man, and His Devoted Friends; and Presenting Entwined with the varying story, the Key to a Diamond United States, or a Vitally Consolidated Republic, A Perfect Union, Otherwise Kingdom of Heaven. Likewise Giving, in Picturesque Dramatic Dialogue, the Notorious Actions and Secret Lives of Two Celebrated Dictators of Party and Leaders in Political Conventions. The Whole Embodied in A Thrilling and Exquisite Poetical Romance. New-York: Kennedy. DLC, HRC

Mostly on current evils but includes a eutopia based on universal suffrage and everyone becoming their own landlord by buying property through rent in installments. Marriage at sixteen. Loaded with generalities and terribly written. See also 1860 Lookup, The Road Made Plain and 1860 Lookup, Soldier of the People. Two other works that are related but not specifically utopian appear to complete Lookup’s publications–Italy free, or Our hero abroad, representing the enlightened battle of the age, beginning at Rome and ending in a triumphal entry into Paris. New-York: Kennedy, 1859; and The granddaughter of the Caesars, or, The hag of the earth and the syren of the waters: containing, besides, a pathetic story of greed’s victims and difficulty’s brokers. New York: Kennedy, 1860. Excelsior, Soldier of the People, and The granddaughter of the Caesar’s are included, separately paged, in his Popular Romances for the Times. I. Excelsior; or, An interesting young man and his friends. II. The soldier of the people; or, The enlightened captain and liberator. III. The granddaughter of the Caesars; or, Hag of the earth and syren of the waters. New York: Kennedy, 1860.