"Ode to New Zealand. A Growl in a Sou'-Wester"

Title"Ode to New Zealand. A Growl in a Sou'-Wester"
Year for Search1856
AuthorsR[aven], [Rev.] J[ohn](1821-86), and R[ouse], Dr. J[ohn] T[homas](1832-84)
Secondary Authors[Reeves], [William Pember], and [Ward], [J.]
Tertiary AuthorsDr. J. T. R., and J., R.
Secondary TitleThe Book of Canterbury Rhymes
Pagination82-85
Date Published1856
PublisherWard and Reeves, Printer
Place PublishedChristchurch, New Zealand
KeywordsMale author, New Zealand author
Annotation

Poem that refers to New Zealand as the “Eden of the Southern Sea” with many examples of its eutopian nature and then shifts to a description of the winds, the poor placement of the cities, and so forth.

Additional Publishers

2nd ed. as Canterbury Rhymes: With Notes and an Appendix. Ed. W[illiam] P[ember] Reeves (Christchurch, New Zealand: Ptd by the ‘Lyttelton Times’ Co. Ltd., 1883), 66-68. In the 2nd ed. Reeves identifies the author as Rouse, but two separate copies of the first edition identify the author as Raven. Originally published in a Christchurch newspaper (probably the Lyttelton Times) in November 1856.

Holding Institutions

ATL, VUW

Author Note

Reeves identifies the author as Rouse (1832-84), but two separate copies of the first edition identify the author as Raven (1821-86). 

Full Text

1856 R[aven], [Rev.] J[ohn] (1821-86) or Dr. J[ohn] T[homas] R[ouse] (1832-84). “Ode to New Zealand. A Growl in a Sou’-Wester.” The Book of Canterbury Rhymes [Ed. William Pember Reeves and J. Ward] (Christchurch, New Zealand: Ward and Reeves, Printer, 1866), 82-85. 2nd ed. as Canterbury Rhymes: With Notes and an Appendix. Ed. W[illiam] P[ember] Reeves (Christchurch, New Zealand: Ptd by the ‘Lyttelton Times’ Co. Ltd., 1883), 66-68. In the 2nd ed. Reeves identifies the author as Rouse, but two separate copies of the first edition identify the author as Raven. Originally published in a Christchurch newspaper (probably the Lyttelton Times) in November 1856. ATL, VUW

Poem that refers to New Zealand as the “Eden of the Southern Sea” with many examples of its eutopian nature and then shifts to a description of the winds, the poor placement of the cities, and so forth.