The Secret of Mankind With Some Singular Hints Gathered in the Elsewheres or After-Life, From Certain Eminent Personages As Also Some Brief Account of the Planet Mercury and Of Its Institutions

TitleThe Secret of Mankind With Some Singular Hints Gathered in the Elsewheres or After-Life, From Certain Eminent Personages As Also Some Brief Account of the Planet Mercury and Of Its Institutions
Year for Search1895
Authors[Brewer], [Willis](1844-1912)
Date Published1895
PublisherG. P. Putnam's Sons
Place PublishedNew York
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

The eutopia is on Mercury. Life is centered on the parish and in the parish on the communal hall, which is always open. Each hall has a library, museum, etc., and education takes place there through contact with educated people. Disputes are adjudicated there, contracts and marriages announced, plays performed, etc. Everyone works at a variety jobs. There are no taxes, no holidays, and estates vest in the parish on death. Only about 50% of the people marry. Marriage is seen as a partnership of equals and divorce is easy and frequent.

Holding Institutions

L, O, W3,665

Author Note

The author (1844-1912) was a lawyer from Alabama who served in various state offices and in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1897 to 1901.

Full Text

1895 [Brewer, Willis] (1844-1912). The Secret of Mankind With Some Singular Hints Gathered in the Elsewheres or After-Life, From Certain Eminent Personages As Also Some Brief Account of the Planet Mercury and Of Its Institutions. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons. L, O, PSt, W3,665

The eutopia is on Mercury. Life is centered on the parish and in the parish on the communal hall, which is always open. Each hall has a library, museum, etc., and education takes place there through contact with educated people. Disputes are adjudicated there, contracts and marriages announced, plays performed, etc. Everyone works at a variety jobs. There are no taxes, no holidays, and estates vest in the parish on death. Only about 50% of the people marry. Marriage is seen as a partnership of equals and divorce is easy and frequent. The author was a lawyer from Alabama who served in various state offices and in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1897 to 1901.