The Storm of London: A Social Rhapsody

TitleThe Storm of London: A Social Rhapsody
Year for Search1904
Authors[Blaze de Bury], [Mme.] [Fernande](d. 1931)
Tertiary AuthorsDickberry, F. [pseud.]
Date Published1904
PublisherJohn Long
Place PublishedLondon
KeywordsFemale author, French author, Scottish author
Annotation

Humorous eutopia. Reform through the disappearance of clothes and of anything that could be used as covering, including paper. People are unable to recognize each other. Stress on class. Only occurs in England and the novel is centered on upper class London. Not being able to tell police from non-police, the streets become self-policing; government collapses. Much employment (manufactures and shops) disappear, shops initially turned into great dining halls. Since there is no paper, most money is gone, and an economy in which everyone does some useful labor develops. No eroticism; morally better. Reunification of churches. Technological advances using electricity.

Additional Publishers

U. S. ed. Boston, MA: Herbert B. Turner, 1905. Both eds. have H. Dicksberry on the cover.

Pseudonym

F. Dickberry [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

HRC, L, LLL

Author Note

The female author (d. 1931) lived in both France and Scotland

Full Text

1904 [Blaze de Bury, Mme. Fernande] (d. 1931). The Storm of London: A Social Rhapsody. By F. Dickberry [pseud.]. London: John Long. U. S. ed. Boston, MA: Herbert B. Turner, 1905. Both eds. have H. Dicksberry on the cover. HRC, L, LLL

Humorous eutopia. Reform through the disappearance of clothes and of anything that could be used as covering, including paper. People are unable to recognize each other. Stress on class. Only occurs in England and the novel is centered on upper class London. Not being able to tell police from non-police, the streets become self-policing; government collapses. Much employment (manufactures and shops) disappear, shops initially turned into great dining halls. Since there is no paper, most money is gone, and an economy in which everyone does some useful labor develops. No eroticism; morally better. Reunification of churches. Technological advances using electricity. The female author lived in both France and Scotland.