"Three Hundred Years Hence"

Title"Three Hundred Years Hence"
Year for Search1836
Authors[Griffith], [Mary](1800?-46)
Tertiary AuthorsAuthor of "Our Neighborhood," &c., The [pseud.]
Secondary TitleCamperdown; or, News from Our Neighborhood: Being Sketches
Pagination9-92
Date Published1836
PublisherCarey, Lea and Blanchard
Place PublishedPhiladelphia, PA
KeywordsFemale author, US author
Annotation

Eutopia. A strict, reformed society brought about by the economic equality of women. Technologically advanced. Clergy hired for life and in most jobs and professions people remain rather than move for advancement or more money. Literature censured.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. under the title of the utopia Philadelphia, PA: Prime Press, 1950; [Rpt. Boston, MA: Gregg Press, 1975], with an “Introduction” by Nelson F. Adkins rev. from its original publication as “An Early American Story of Utopia.” Colophon, ns 1 (July 1935): 123-32; rpt. from the original in American Utopias: Selected Short Fiction. Ed. Arthur O. Lewis, Jr. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971. All items separately paged; and in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 31-48 with an editor’s note on 29-30. The Prime Press ed. has many typographical errors. 

Pseudonym

By the Author of “Our Neighborhood” [pseud.]

Holding Institutions

CSmH, MoU-St, PSt, W1,1071

Author Note

Female author (1800?-46)

Full Text

1836 [Griffith, Mary] (1800?-46). “Three Hundred Years Hence.” In her Camperdown; or, News from Our Neighborhood: Being Sketches. By the Author of “Our Neighborhood” [pseud.] (Philadelphia, PA: Carey, Lea and Blanchard, 1836), 9-92. Rpt. under the title of the utopia Philadelphia, PA: Prime Press, 1950; [Rpt. Boston, MA: Gregg Press, 1975], with an “Introduction” by Nelson F. Adkins rev. from its original publication as “An Early American Story of Utopia.” Colophon, ns 1 (July 1935): 123-32; rpt. from the original in American Utopias: Selected Short Fiction. Ed. Arthur O. Lewis, Jr. New York: Arno Press and The New York Times, 1971. All items separately paged; and in Daring To Dream: Utopian Stories by United States Women, 1836-1919. Ed. Carol Farley Kessler (London: Pandora Press, 1984), 31-48 with an editor’s note on 29-30. The Prime Press ed. has many typographical errors. CSmH, MoU-St, PSt,  W1,1071

Eutopia. A strict, reformed society brought about by the economic equality of women. Technologically advanced. Clergy hired for life and in most jobs and professions people remain rather than move for advancement or more money. Literature censured. Female author.