A Tramp in Society

TitleA Tramp in Society
Year for Search1891
AuthorsCowdrey, Robert H.
Volume / EditionAriel Library 2.5
Pagination290 pp.
Date PublishedJune 1891
PublisherFrancis J. Schulte & Co
Place PublishedChicago, IL
KeywordsMale author, US author
Annotation

Chapter XV “The City of Freeland” is a description of an industrial town and farm community run for the benefit of the workers. Land is free, and this is the key. Security in the land comes from improving it. No women or children in factory work. “Their natural protectors are able to support them and would feel disgraced if they had to ask their children to assist them in earning a living.” Employers and workers both benefit. Farmers supply the city; as a result, they are not under the heel of the railroads. “Here the farmer is the suburban resident of the city. His well-paved roads are but extensions of the city streets.” No saloons. Stress on the power of public opinion. Gets rid of the middle-man. In the last chapter of the book, the Freeland model has extended to the entire country. Also includes “The Sequel to Robinson Crusoe.” Rpt. in The Nationalization News: The Journal of the Nationalization of Labour Society. Established to promote the System proposed in “LOOKING BACKWARD 3.28 [January 1893: 1-3]) in which Crusoe exploits others through his ownership of the land, which produces a dystopia. Crusoe sees the light and free access to land produces a eutopia. The utopia Ten Men of Money Island (1884) by Seymour F. Norton (b. 1841) is a sequel, and according to Michael Flürscheim (1844-1912), he wrote his utopia The Real History of Money Island (1896) in response to the inadequacies of Norton.

Info Notes

The utopia Ten Men of Money Island (1884) by Seymour F. Norton (b. 1841) is a sequel, and according to Michael Flürscheim (1844-1912), he wrote his utopia The Real History of Money Island (1896) in response to the inadequacies of Norton.

Holding Institutions

NN, PSt, W3,1229

Full Text

1891 Cowdrey, Robert H. A Tramp in Society. Chicago, IL: Francis J. Schulte & Co. Ariel Library 2.5 (June 1891). 290 pp. NN, PSt, W3,1229

Chapter XV “The City of Freeland” is a description of an industrial town and farm community run for the benefit of the workers. Land is free, and this is the key. Security in the land comes from improving it. No women or children in factory work. “Their natural protectors are able to support them and would feel disgraced if they had to ask their children to assist them in earning a living.” Employers and workers both benefit. Farmers supply the city; as a result, they are not under the heel of the railroads. “Here the farmer is the suburban resident of the city. His well-paved roads are but extensions of the city streets.” No saloons. Stress on the power of public opinion. Gets rid of the middle-man. In the last chapter of the book, the Freeland model has extended to the entire country. Also includes “The Sequel to Robinson Crusoe.” Rpt. in The Nationalization News: The Journal of the Nationalization of Labour Society. Established to promote the System proposed in “LOOKING BACKWARD 3.28 [January 1893: 1-3]) in which Crusoe exploits others through his ownership of the land, which produces a dystopia. Crusoe sees the light and free access to land produces a eutopia. The utopia Ten Men of Money Island (1884) by Seymour F. Norton (b. 1841) is a sequel, and according to Michael Flürscheim (1844-1912), he wrote his utopia The Real History of Money Island (1896) in response to the inadequacies of Norton.