A Voyage to Cacklogallinia: With a Description of the Religion, Policy, Customs and Manners of that Country

TitleA Voyage to Cacklogallinia: With a Description of the Religion, Policy, Customs and Manners of that Country
Year for Search1727
AuthorsBrunt, Captain Samuel [pseud.]
Date Published1727
PublisherPtd. by J. Watson
Place PublishedLondon
Annotation

Satire. Begins as a Robinsonade, and then becomes a Gulliver tale with the hero visiting a land of virtuous chickens that had become corrupt and petty. Here the stress is on the differences between theory and practice. Finally, the chickens fly the narrator to the moon, where he finds a eutopia. The moon is described as a beautiful, verdant Arcadia. The Selenites are the souls of the virtuous from Earth. They are vegetarians. All are equal and have no need for government but revere their eldest as their prince. All souls are masculine.

Additional Publishers

Rpt. with the subtitle Reproduced from the Original Edition, 1727, With an Introduction by Marjorie Nicolson. New York: Published for The Facsimile Text Society by Columbia University Press, 1940; New York: Garland, 1972; in The Virgin Seducer and The Batchelor-Keeper by John Clarke The State of Learning in the Empire of Lilliput Anonymous A Voyage To Cacklogallinia by Captain Samuel Brunt (New York: Garland, 1972), separately paged; and in Gulliveriana: IV. Ed. Jeanne Welcher and George E. Bush, Jr. (Delmar, NY: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1973), 1-43.

Pseudonym

Captain Samuel Brunt [pseud.].

Holding Institutions

HRC, PSt

Full Text

1727 Brunt, Captain Samuel [pseud.]. A Voyage to Cacklogallinia: With a Description of the Religion, Policy, Customs and Manners of that Country. London: Ptd. by J. Watson. Rpt. with the subtitle Reproduced from the Original Edition, 1727, With an Introduction by Marjorie Nicolson. New York: Published for The Facsimile Text Society by Columbia University Press, 1940; New York: Garland, 1972; in The Virgin Seducer and The Batchelor-Keeper by John Clarke The State of Learning in the Empire of Lilliput Anonymous A Voyage To Cacklogallinia by Captain Samuel Brunt (New York: Garland, 1972), separately paged; and in Gulliveriana: IV. Ed. Jeanne Welcher and George E. Bush, Jr. (Delmar, NY: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1973), 1-43. HRC, PSt

Satire. Begins as a Robinsonade, and then becomes a Gulliver tale with the hero visiting a land of virtuous chickens that had become corrupt and petty. Here the stress is on the differences between theory and practice. Finally, the chickens fly the narrator to the moon, where he finds a eutopia. The moon is described as a beautiful, verdant Arcadia. The Selenites are the souls of the virtuous from Earth. They are vegetarians. All are equal and have no need for government but revere their eldest as their prince. All souls are masculine.